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Interesting information about Ice skating costumes

Interesting information you may never have known about ice skating costumes.

We’ve collected some of the most interesting little factoids regarding ice skating costumes in this quick guide, and we think some of them are going to surprise you.

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More than 100,000 crystals can cover some ice skating costumes

If you’ve noticed professional ice skaters (especially in the Winter Olympics) gliding around the ice in a suit or dress that looks as though it’s made from small fragments of the frozen surface they are skating, you’ve no doubt wondered just how many crystals are attached to these dresses in the first place.

Some ice skating costumes can have more than 100,000 individual crystals attached to a single dress, and what’s even more surprising than that is that these crystals must be applied by hand – which makes these crystal covered costumes considerably more expensive than other options.

It’s not uncommon for a traditional ice-skating dress to take about four hours to make from start to finish, but crystals can add almost 40 hours of extra time to that process!

Most skaters use only one or two costumes every season

A lot of people – especially fans of figure skating – are under the impression that these top-tier athletes are changing out their clothes faster than Britney Spears at a concert, but nothing could be further from the truth!

In fact, the overwhelming majority of figure skaters (including a lot of top-tier professionals) are using one or two costumes every single season and wearing particular event dress every single time they step out onto the ice.

Part of that is because these ice-skating costumes can cost upwards of $5000 or more (especially if they were made by legendary designers in the fashion world). Another part of it is most figure skaters practice a single routine to use in competition for that year and want to make sure that their costume fits semantically with the kind of routine they are trotting out in front of the judges.

Ice-skating costumes are getting sleeker, thinner, and more form fitting

In the past, the overwhelming majority of figure skating costumes were a lot of the costumes that ballet dancers wore – very ornate, very stylized, and with a lot of extra frills and accessories to be found throughout the entire design.

Today the exact opposite is true!

Russian figure skaters were the first to usher in much sleeker, much more streamlined, and much more fashion forward ice-skating costumes and the rest of the world followed their lead.

No longer are you likely to find top-tier professional figure skaters cruising around the ice in a dress that they could have worn to a prom or a ball somewhere, but instead you’ll find them in much sleeker costumes that look a lot more like a one piece bathing suit than anything else!

Some figure skating moves are more likely than others to cause “wardrobe malfunctions.”

Figure skaters have to move their body and as many unique and contorting ways as humanly possible with real grace and elegance to score highly during their routine, and that means pushing the human body to the limits while out on the ice just as much as possible.

At the same time, it’s important that figure skaters (and their coaches) think about which elements to work into a routine depending upon the type of costume they are wearing. One spending, in particular, involves skaters leaning back, grabbing their skate, and then lifting it above and behind their head – and this is the move that is most likely to cause a wardrobe malfunction.

Coaches will usually focus on choosing costumes that eliminate this unnecessary and unwanted exposure, all by running through the following checklist:

  • Do these ice-skating costumes fit thematically?
  • Do these ice-skating costumes provide flexibility for the full range of motion on the ice?
  • Do these ice-skating costumes provide plenty of covers even through more involved movements?

So much time as they check on every box, everything is good to go!